Windom Allergy, Asthma, Sinus

Food Allergy 102: Testing for Food Allergies

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Do You Have A Food Allergy? Check out this post. Responses to food allergies can be quite variable from individual to individual. It may involve gastrointestinal reactions including nausea, abdominal cramps, vomiting, and diarrhea, itchy rash, hives, asthma and hay fever, swelling of the lips, tongue and throat, migraine headaches and in severe cases, anaphylaxis. Some cases of food-induced hives or anaphylaxis are dependent on a cofactor for exacerbation of clinical symptoms. The only cofactor clearly demonstrated to provoke symptoms is exercise. Before one should embark on an investigation of a food allergy, there must be a reasonable suspicion of food...

How is eczema cured?

At present, eczema can not be cured, but it can usually be managed so that your child can play and live comfortably.  The condition is often "outgrown" though not by age 2-3 as is often thought.  Statistics suggest that approximately 50% of children will completely lose their eczema, and 40% will have only minor, localized or occasional skin lesions.  The remaining 10%, however, will continue to have a major problem with eczema in adulthood. The location of the rash on your child may change with age.  In infants it is located mostly on the face, abdomen, and parts of the arms...

What's responsible for your spring misery? Live Oak.

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Live Oak allergy is the most troublesome pollen for spring allergy sufferers. The yellow-green oak pollen coats everything from your car to the sidewalk — and even the grass-heavy pollen can linger in the air for weeks depending on whether or not we receive any rain.   The oak tree pollen we get over those 2 months makes up 80% of all our combined pollen for the year (grass, weeds, and other trees). The resulting allergy and asthma symptoms can be miserable. Classic spring “hay fever” symptoms can include nasal congestion and drainage, sneezing, itching and eye irritation. And if you are...

Food Allergy 101: Do You Have A True Food Allergy?

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A true food allergy or food hypersensitivity is an adverse reaction to a food or food component that involves the body's immune system. Using milk as an example, an immunologic response would be cow's milk protein allergy, whereas the nonimmunologic response would be lactose intolerance, due to lactase deficiency. Although many people believe they have a food allergy, true food allergies are rare, affecting 1-3% of children under 6 years and less than 2% of adults in the general population.  While any food protein is potentially capable of eliciting an allergic reaction, most reactions are due to a limited number of...

Allergy Shots Reduce Asthma Medications

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An European study published in the leading allergy medical journal, the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , shows that allergy shots helped people with asthma reduce their steroid medications. Asthmatic children between the ages of 6-17 requiring daily inhaled steroids to control their asthma were invited to enroll in the 2 year study, wherein half were placed on allergy shots and the other half were treated with medications alone. The group on allergy shots was able to reduce their inhaled steroid dose by 50%, while at the same time maintain better asthma control than before the study According to Dr....

Are you one of the 90% of patients who no longer have a penicillin allergy?

Had a penicillin allergy as a kid? You probably don't now. To prove a penicillin allergy exists, we skin test with penicillin and one of its breakdown products.  You will be tested with what we call the major breakdown product of penicillin (commercially available as PrePen), plain penicillin and in some patients, ampicillin or a cephalosporin.  In addition, skin testing with salt water (to which no one should react) and histamine (to which everyone should react) is used to help distinguish between negative and positive skin test reactions.  Test agents are placed on the forearm and then scratched with a small...

What are chronic hives?

By definition hives that continue to recur for greater than six weeks are considered chronic.  Rarely is an identifiable etiology for the hives discovered.  Because of the remote possibility of an underlying pathologic process, such as infection, abnormal thyroid gland function, malignancy or rheumatoid arthritis, a review of your health history and limited blood testing directed toward these entities is routine practice.  Fortunately, most cases (~ 75%) resolve within one year.  Therapy is symptomatic, aiming to reduce itching while the hives run their course. How can hives be treated? Avoidance of the foods, drugs, or other provoking factors is recommended whenever...

Part 1: Acute asthma, prognosis, and treatment

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Jennifer E. Fergeson, DO, Shiven S. Patel, MD, and Richard F. Lockey, MD Asthma affects about 300 million people globally and accounts for 1 in every 250 deaths in the world. Approximately 12 million people in the United States each year experience an acute exacerbation of their asthma, a quarter of which require hospitalization. ~~~ PHYSICAL EXAMINATION Clinical estimates of severity based on an interview and physical examination can result in an inaccurate estimation of disease severity; audible wheezing is usually a sign of moderate asthma, whereas no wheezing can be a sign of severe airflow obstruction. Symptoms of severe asthma...

Learn more about Jean Vessel

Jean Vessel, Born in Sarasota and lived here my whole life Hobbies include cooking, fishing and anything family related Between my husband and I we have 5 children, twin boys Christopher and Jonathan 3 daughters , Selena, Sara and Toni. Son in law Troy. 5 grandchildren Josh, Dustin, Colton, Trey, and Tanner. We have many pets including a dog, cat, rabbit, hamster and macaw What would people be most surprised to know about you? I am a retired Firefighter / Paramedic

Working on your Asthma Wellness

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Asthma is a chronic condition and after awhile, you know your body well enough to tell when it is acting up or flaring. This often occurs with a viral infection, but also changes in temperature or season, new allergens in your environment (grandma and her cat come to visit, for too long!), or you run out of your daily maintenance medicines. When this happens, what do you do? At Windom Allergy we empower you to take Action! See our ‘Action Plan’ which when filled out specifically for you, will guide you step by step to self-manage you through an asthma flare....
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Mon  8:30 - 5:00
Tue  8:30 - 6:00
Wed  8:30 - 4:30
Thu  7:30 - 4:30
Fri  8:30 - 4:00
Location
3570 S Tuttle Ave
Sarasota, FL . 34239
941-927-4888
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Windom Allergy, Asthma & Sinus
Food Allergy Center of Florida